Parking

LATEST NEWS! Details of the proposed parking controls, including public exhibition dates and drawings, are now on the City Council website: glasgow.gov.uk/NKNWS. Following our special meeting on Tuesday 2nd July 2019 to discuss the community response to the parking consultation, we sent a statement to the City Council.

The level of parking and traffic in the North Kelvin area has become a growing concern, whether it relates to finding a parking space close to home or being able to cross the road safely. Residents have raised the issue at our meetings and on social media (eg Nextdoor North Kelvin). Cars are routinely parked on corners, and we have evidence of cars being left parked for weeks at a time by owners based outwith our area.

Read on to find out more about the proposed implementation of parking restrictions.

Controlled Parking Zones

Glasgow City Council has implemented Controlled (or Restricted) Parking Zones (CPZs) in a number of areas of the city.

There is a set of criteria to identify priority areas for consideration. North Kelvin scores highly on these criteria. It is included in the Roads Department’s current work plan.

This map shows current areas where there are CPZs (click on the minus sign, top left of the map, to see more than just the city centre).

The Roads Department is implementing a CPZ in the Hyndland/Hughenden area, and is working on Events Day parking schemes for Celtic Park and Ibrox Stadium and making adjustments to some existing zones west of the City Centre. So it is likely that the process for a CPZ for North Kelvin (and Woodside) would commence early in 2019.

The process usually takes 6 to 12 months. The likely completion date would be 2020.

Charges and hours of operation vary depending on the individual CPZ.

Further information on the most recent parking controls is available in the Parking section of the City Council website, including some links to “before and after” pictures, eg in Woodside.

The situation in North Kelvin

There is a tendency for drivers seeking to avoid paying for parking to switch to adjacent areas where there are no charges. This has affected adversely the level of parking and traffic in North Kelvin.

Now that a CPZ is being introduced in Hyndland/Hughenden, the only areas in the West End not covered by a CPZ will be North Kelvin and part of Woodside.

The North Kelvin/Woodside area is quite a large one. There are other proposed developments close by which might also impact on parking and traffic in the area:

  • the new Woodside Health Centre
  • the refurbishment of Byres Road
  • proposed new primary school at Queen Margaret Drive/Maryhill Road
  • refurbishment of Queen Margaret Drive
  • walking/cycling initiatives, including cycle lanes and public spaces, in the Woodside area.

Public consultation

The CPZ process for North Kelvin would begin with a public exhibition and drop-in, where residents can meet City Council officers to discuss the issues they are experiencing.

Since the changes are significant, the Community Council feels that residents should be made aware of what is happening. This will enable people to begin to research and discuss issues. By the time the formal consultation begins it is hoped that residents will be better prepared to engage constructively in the process.

Send us your parking feedback

Tell us what your concerns and priorities are. You can contact us:

Our view

Following our public consultation meeting in July 2019, we submitted the following statement.

North Kelvin Community Council supports the introduction of an RPZ in North Kelvin and North Woodside subject to the following concerns:

  1. The creation of some one-way streets may create new “rat runs,” particularly in connections to Great Western Road and Maryhill Road, and this issue would need to be addressed.
  2. The difficulty of access and egress at the junction of Belmont Street and Great Western Road needs to be considered. Although we are aware that this junction is out-with the proposed RPZ, we suggest consideration to introducing traffic lights to deal with potentially dangerous side road/main road junctions, particularly widening the Bank Street/GWR set to embrace Belmont and Otago Street.
  3. The one-way system may encourage driving at excessive speeds in these streets. We ask that consideration be given to the introduction of limited traffic calming measures in these roads in order to enforce the 20mph limit.
  4. We feel that the cost of the business parking permits for sole traders is expensive and should be reconsidered.
  5. The preferred time when parking charges should apply is Monday to Sunday 8am – 10pm.
  6. We are in favour of parking on both sides of one-way streets. However, if contraflow cycling is permitted in these streets, parking on one side only would be required.
  7. Consideration should be given to end-on parking in certain carriageways to maximise the number of spaces that can be accommodated on the street/road e.g. Queen Margaret Drive, top of Oban/Fergus Drives.
  8. That consideration be given to speed limits on Queen Margaret Drive and Maryhill Road when the scheme is introduced.
  9. Consideration should be given to creating bays on the carriageway that would accommodate wheelie and larger waste bins on the carriageway rather than on the pavements.

We received this response from Glasgow City Council on 21 August 2019:

1. The creation of some one-way streets may create new “rat runs,” particularly in connections to Great Western Road and Maryhill Road, and this issue would need to be addressed.
Our motivation towards limiting the direction of traffic within certain roads was to allow for increase parking provision. In roads such as Wilton Street, there is both a large demand for parking and limited carriageway width in which to achieve the necessary provision. It was therefore believed that the inclusion of a single directional flow of traffic would work towards increasing the available parking whilst also working as a means of avoiding traffic/ rat- running. Where it is safe to do so we aim to incorporate as many publicly suggested solutions as possible, where residents can demonstrate practices that are both in accordance with design requirements and agreeable to the existing users/ residents.

2. Introduce or upgrade the existing traffic signals at the junctions of Bank Street/ Great Western Road/ Belmont Street and Raeberry Street/ Maryhill Road to improve current and future access to the North Kelvin and North Woodside area.
On review, I can advise that when inspected the existing traffic signal equipment was found to be operating satisfactorily and that vehicles were able to enter and exit Belmont Street without undue delay.

It would not be possible to incorporate Belmont Street into the existing configuration without replacing all existing equipment and infrastructure. This would also require the removal of a number of existing parking bays. As a consequence, it should be noted that extending the existing junction would lead to an increase in overall congestion on Great Western Road and an increase in pedestrian waiting times.

Although analysis of Police Scotland’s latest injury accident records for the area revealed there to have been three recorded accidents in the standard 3 year period 1 May 2016 to 30 Apr 2019, none of these involved traffic entering or exiting Belmont Street. Arrangements have been made to have the road markings on the yellow box junction at this location refurbished.

Raeberry Street/ Maryhill Road/ Napiershall Street – to allow improved access for those exiting from Raeberry Street

I can advise that it would not be appropriate to signal Raeberry Street separately from the existing junction at Napiershall Street. Incorporating Raeberry Street into the existing junction configuration would require the removal of the existing pedestrian crossing on Maryhill Road and the removal of existing traffic calming measures on Raeberry Street. It should be noted that extending the existing junction would lead to an increase in overall congestion on Maryhill Road and an increase in pedestrian waiting times.

Similarly, an analysis of Police Scotland’s latest injury accident records for this area reveal that there have been no recorded accidents in the standard 3 year period 1 May 2016 to 30 Apr 2019.

Whilst I sympathise with residents’ concerns, I regret that I am unable to install additional traffic signals at this location at the present time.

3. The one-way system may encourage driving at excessive speeds in these streets. We ask that consideration be given to the introduction of limited traffic calming measures in these roads in order to enforce the 20mph limit.
On the implementation of the scheme should residents/ motorists be concerned about the speed of vehicles within the proposed zone they should raise this with us, at which point we can request radar speed surveys be carried out. The results of which will determine any requirement for traffic calming measures.

4. We feel that the cost of the business parking permits for sole traders is expensive and should be reconsidered.
Whilst I understand your concern, the cost of a business parking permit was only recently reviewed within the Glasgow City Council’s City Government Budget 2018 – 2019, during which the Council reduced the cost of business parking permits from £700 to £650 , emphasising the Council’s high level objective to “Support the continuing physical, social, economic, cultural and environmental regeneration of the City by maintaining and promoting efficient and effective transportation services and infrastructure within Glasgow.”. Please note, any decisions to alter, increase or reduce the cost of parking permits is done so during the City Council’s Government Budget review.

5. The preferred time when parking charges should apply is Monday to Sunday 8am – 10pm.
I can advise that your preferred restriction times have been noted along with feedback provided by residents and, will where possible be included within any modifications prior to the next stage of this process, It is our intention that we will commence with the statutory process by consulting with professional road users at the end of August / beginning of September where we will contact freight transport groups, emergency services and other groups. Following the consultation, we then publish the proposals for individuals to register any formal support or objection for the scheme. Should you wish to register support or objection you are invited to do so at this time.

6. We are in favour of parking on both sides of one-way streets. However, if contraflow cycling is permitted in these streets, parking on one side only would be required.
I can advise your cycle traffic suggestions have been noted for consideration and, advise that the safety of all road and footway users is considered prior to any proposals.

7. Consideration should be given to end-on parking in certain carriageways to maximise the number of spaces that can be accommodated on the street/road e.g. Queen Margaret Drive, top of Oban/Fergus Drives.
Where it is safe to do so, we aim to incorporate as many publicly suggested solutions as possible. Where residents can demonstrate practices that are both in accordance with design requirements and agreeable to the existing users/ residents, we will work towards incorporating these within our new workplan. Please note however, it is important that any proposals/ amendments include sufficient consideration and allowances for the safety of road users, the access of cleansing vehicles, the improved access of emergency service vehicles, enhanced visibility to both motorists and pedestrians and unobstructed access to dropped kerbs for individuals wishing to cross.

8. That consideration be given to speed limits on Queen Margaret Drive and Maryhill Road when the scheme is introduced.
On the implementation of or prior to the implementation of any parking controls should residents/ motorists be concerned about the speed of vehicles on Queen Margaret Drive and Maryhill Road, speed surveys can be carried out. The results of which will determine any requirement for traffic calming measures.

9. Consideration should be given to creating bays on the carriageway that would accommodate wheelie and larger waste bins on the carriageway rather than on the pavements.
Whilst we understand your request, our objective is to both maximise the availability of parking whilst being considerate of resident’s needs and requirements. We would therefore not look to reduce the availability of parking at this time.

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7 comments

  • This is just pure NIMBY at it’s best.

  • Jill Ferguson

    Thornwood is also waiting on having a CPZ introduced in it.
    As Partick East & Hillhead now has one. Which has pushed alot of parking further into Thornwood.

    Charging for parking may be a solution for restricting people parking from outside the areas.

    But residents permits are NOT guarantees of their spaces, just authorisation to park in them.

    So there are still loopholes in the system which is far from perfect.

  • Neil Paterson

    The Cambridge Dictionary definition of NIMBY states ” an abbreviation for not in my back yard: a person who does not want something unpleasant but necessary to be built or done near where they live”
    We are not wanting anything built but are simply trying to restore order in our streets through CPZ`s & to stop from being a free car park for commuters, people from RPZ`s who don`t want to pay £50/year to park & people using the airport and using us as a free long term car park. As demonstrated at meetings, we have full backing from all the local councillors. Everybody has the right to disagree & they should say so either at meetings or to their local representatives.

  • Alison H.McDonald

    When and where would this public consultation take place and how would residents be notified as I cannot see any information on the Glasgow City Council website at the moment that relates to our area or gives any information regarding dates of the RPZ consultation.

  • The consultation is expected to take place in the spring of this year but dates are not yet available. We will be publicising the consultation as widely as we can once we have further information, so please check back here for details or join our mailing list if you haven’t already done so. Thanks for your Q.

  • We need resident parking unfortunately noe

  • I leave to go to work at 7:30am in the morning and shocked to see the amount of cars queuing for people to leave their spaces. It is becoming extremely frustrating to not being able to get a car parking space on your street, let alone parking in another area. I have now noticed a lot of students parking in Belmont st/Wilton st due to the restrictions on campus. About time something is done about these rogue parkers as it has been going on for too long.

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